N. 12 (2019)

N. 12 (2019)

Table of Contents

Researches and essays

On the Mirror of the Sphinx. United Kingdom and Egypt Setting the Foundations for the United States Capitalist Expansion in the Beginnings of the XX Century in the Caribbean, 1-45

Gabriel Alemán Rodríguez

Historical keys to rethink the theoretical foundation of argentine national identity. Ezequiel Ramos Mejía and Hipólito Irigoyen’s patriotic projects (1908-1919) 46-63

Cielo Zaidenwerg

The democratic city, the neighborhood movement, the Barcelona Model and citizien participation: one state of the question and proposal for analysis, 64-84

Arnau López Espinosa

Working class and transition: a vision from the factory,  85-109

Marta Mulero

Rereading Taula de Canvi: A bewildered left within a country in transition, 110-138

Francesc Vilanova

Debates and dialogues

Without a future there is no past. Dialogue around the teaching of History and citizenship, 139-163

Fernando Hernández Sánchez, Alessandro Pes

Reviews and lecture notes164-206

 

Abstracts and Keywords

On the Mirror of the Sphinx. United Kingdom and Egypt Setting the Foundations for the United States Capitalist Expansion in the Beginnings of the XX Century in the Caribbean

Gabriel Alemán Rodríguez

From the Spanish-American War in 1898 until beyond World War I, the United States undertook an expansionist crusade unprecedented in the history of the American continent. The new power that disputed global hegemony militarily occupied Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Panama, Nicaragua, and Mexico, paving the way for the establishment of its banks and companies, which would integrate the region to the growth and development of its monopoly- financial capital. However, the method was not novel. Already at the end of the previous century, the British had laid the foundations for the deployment of such imperialist domination. That is why, like Giovanni Arrighi, I contextualize my reading in the framework of The Long 20th Century that began in the 1870s and extends through the next century. Therefore, in this article, I try to examine how the British occupation of Egypt in 1882 and the debt argument marked certain guidelines that allow us to understand the dynamics assumed by US imperialism in its expansion in the early twentieth century in the Caribbean.

Egypt; Great Britain; United States; Dominican Republic; Mediterranean; Caribbean; imperialism; capitalism; crisis; debt; military occupation

Historical keys to rethink the theoretical foundation of argentine national identity. Ezequiel Ramos Mejía and Hipólito Irigoyen’s patriotic projects (1908-1919)

Cielo Zaidenwerg

This work analyzes some keys that allow us to re-dimension the historical and ideological context in which the foundations of the argentine ‘national being’ was developed, above all, in the theoretical design, highlighting the intrinsic value acquired by the task of civilizing and educate the budding population. In this sense, we expose the fundamental role, and the practice and discursive mechanisms assumed by the State and the Creole elites as sponsors of the argentinization process at the beginning of the 20th century. Furthermore, this study arises from the assumption that, in Latin America in general and in Argentina in particular, reinforcing the feeling of national belonging, contributed to legitimize state power beyond the ideological dye of the party- as well as reproduce the domination system.

Argentina; national identity; patriotic education; 20th century

The democratic city, the neighborhood movement, the Barcelona Model and citizen participation: one state of the question and proposal for analysis

Arnau López Espinosa

This article is a proposal of an analytical starting point for an historiographically studying of the evolution and transformation of a city like Barcelona. A proposal for three-way dialogue that aims to include the different aspects of the polyhedron that is the analysis of a city. Therefore, this analysis is based on the premise that, in order to analyze the city, it is necessary to study the dialogue – existing or not – between the rulers and the organized citizenship; Including, then, the different actors that intervene in the evolution and transformation of the city: social movements, city governments and policies of citizen participation. That is, through the analysis of the dialogue between the urban social movements and the democratic Barcelona city governments within the framework of citizen participation policies, indicating their nature, scope and limitations.

urban social movements; neighborhood movement; Barcelona model; citizen participation; democratic city

Working class and transition: a vision from the factory

Marta Mulero

The present article has the objective to expose the main conclusions of the doctoral thesis called Models sindicals al món de la fàbrica (1976-1982). Throughout the study of the working class movement in the metallurgical factories SEAT, ENASA, Hispano Olivetti, Motor Ibérica, Roca Radiadores and Maquinista Terrestre y Marítima, this paper analyzes the main axis of the workers struggle: decent working and salary conditions, democratic freedoms, amnesty, free election of workers’ representatives in companies and, from the mid-seventies and the effects of the economic crisis, the defense of the work places. The main goal of this article is to reflect the key role that the working movement played (along with other social movements) in the destabilization and the exhaustion of the Franco regime and the beginning of a democratic process.

working movement; amnesty; CCOO; factory councils; SEAT

Rereading Taula de Canvi: A bewildered left within a country in transition

Francesc Vilanova

Between the years 1976 and 1980 (therefore, in full departure from the Franco dictatorship towards the establishment of a democratic system), a group of people who came from various leftist organizations, promoted a magazine of analysis and reflection on political, economic, cultural, social, issues, etc. that wanted to deepen into the stage of profound changes, uncertainties and concerns that Catalonia and Spain were living, but also about the past, the present and the future of the world. The result was Taula de Canvi (Change Table), a monthly magazine that addressed Catalan and Spanish affairs, political thinking around the world, the realities and the pasts of the world political systems. Within this broad field of thought, the magazine also reflected on the concern and discomfort of most of the Catalan left with the evolution of the Spanish (and Catalan) transition from dictatorship to the establishment of democracy.

Alfonso C. Comín; PSUC; Bandera Roja; Democratic Transition; Autonomy; Pujolisme; Catalanism; Language; Jordi Solé Tura; Josep Ramoneda; Antoni Castells; Jaume Lorés; Marxism